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The Speed Is In Your Hands

Your hands hold the secret to speed in the water.


Once you’ve got your body position locked in, the only way to get faster is to get more out of your arms.


By changing the speed at which you move your hands during each pull, you can change how fast you swim.


There are two problems that triathletes face when they’re trying to get faster in the water.


1. They need to improve their body position.

2. They need to improve their pull.


I’ve talk about improving body position in depth, and you can check some of my playlists to get the greatest hits.


I’ve also talked a bit about the mechanics of the arm pull.


What needs to happen, how to positions the arms, etc…


There are a couple playlists you can check out about that as well.


Today, we’re going to talk about the forgotten aspect of the pull.


Today, we’re going to talk about speed.


You see, it’s not just about the mechanics of the pull.


HOW you execute the pull matters just as much as the actual technique.


If you want speed in the water, you need to learn to move the hands with speed.


Specifically, you need to learn to ACCELERATE the hands during each pull.


Accelerate The Hands, Accelerate The Water


I distinctly remember the first time this was pointed out to me when I was coaching at the University of Maryland.


It was at one of my first coaching jobs and one of my colleagues pointed it out to me in someone that was a fairly high-level swimmer.


I remember it was like a lightbulb going off, and it made sense why that particular individual was struggling.


She used the analogy of a rocket ship taking off.


There’s not much movement at first, but it builds up and then there’s lift off and rapid acceleration.


The arm pull works the same way.


You start slow, build up speed, and the hands should really be moving by the end of the stroke.


By learning to accelerate the hands, you can get a big boost in speed.


One of the key mistakes that many triathletes make is that they move through the pull at the same speed.


From start to finish, there’s ZERO change in speed.